Students learning through conflict and collaboration

We wanted to use a participatory simulation to demonstrate the benefits of collaboration.  We struggled with getting the code to work, in particular, how to show that certain types of collaboration yield more learning than other.  We were trying to find a way to show that the knowledge of the person who you were collaborating with has an impact on how much you learn and that some collaborations are productive and others aren’t.

Our first attempt was of students learning karate, a particular kind of collaboration in which students learn through battling each other. We created a simulation of students learning karate; as they develop skills, they acquire new belt colours.  In the model, students acquire or lose skill by:

1)   Battling each other: when two students encounter each other, the first to hit the battle button “wins” and takes the skill from the other person and therefore acquires the skills themselves.

2)    Encountering random bystanders (represented by the gray patches) who may have more or fewer skills than they do; if they encounter a bystander with more skill, they lose their own skills to the bystander, if they encounter a bystander with fewer skills, they acquire the bystander’s skills.  Students can choose to avoid or engage the bystanders at their own risk.

Additionally, there is a global plot for skill on the main screen to track the overall change in skill – which duplicates the changes indicated by shifts in color.

In the screen shots below, the white turtle is the student playing and the gray turtle represents the bystanders.  Our key struggle was in coding how to have the students pick up the skills from the bystanders when they encountered them.  One solution we thought of was to colour some of the patches gray and have them be the bystanders – while we had some success in assigning random amounts of skill to the patches, we could not figure out how to distribute the patches randomly at setup.

Karate Tournament

Additionally, there is a global plot for skill on the main screen to track the overall change in skill – which duplicates the changes indicated by shifts in color.

Our second attempt was to have students simply encounter each other and collaborate as well as to try to acquire learning from a teacher – similar to a PacMan type format.  Students chase around moving teachers and gain more knowledge from running into these teachers. There is a counter that monitors their knowledge. they can try to work with other students, but sometimes this will give them more knowledge and sometimes this will give them less demonstrating that collaboration can be more productive and less productive.

Orange turtle is student, figures are teachers

Sarah Chou, Sunita Mohanty and Mehjabeen Datoo

 

Comments are closed.

buy generic cialis online buy cheap levitra from canada order generic propecia accutane cheap online order clomid clomiphene buy generic tamoxifen buy cymbalta online no rx where to buy lexapro buy esomeprazole online 20mg strattera online buy buy synthroid 25 mcg buy prednisone pills celebrex online store cheap ventolin inhalers buy valtrex 1000 mg lasix online canada order cipro no prescription buy antibiotics pills